University Members

Kelly Arbour

Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Ph.D.

Dr. Arbour-Nicitopoulos is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Toronto as well as an Adjunct Scientist at the Bloorview Research Institute. Her research focuses on evidence-based practices for promoting physical activity across the lifespan in populations living with physical disabilities. Dr. Arbour-Nicitopoulos has contributed to many of the evidence-based resources available on from SCI Action Canada such as the Get In Motion service and the SCI Get Fit Toolkit. She currently manages the operations of the Get in Motion service.


Rebecca Bassett-Gunter

Rebecca Bassett-Gunters

My research is focused on understanding psychosocial predictors of health behaviours and the development of optimally effective health promotion messages. I am particularly interested in health promotion among special populations (e.g., people with SCI, MS), as well as children and youth with disabilities. My research has focused on understanding the role of parents and the school environment in youth health promotion.


David Ditor

Dr. David Ditor

Spinal cord injury is a particularly abrupt and life-altering event that is associated with a wide range of physiological and psychological consequences. My research interests include the secondary health complications that accompany spinal cord injury, with particular emphases in the areas of 1) cardiovascular disease and dysfunction after spinal cord injury, 2) immune status after spinal cord injury and its effects on somatic and autonomic neural function, and 3) sexual function in men and women after spinal cord injury. As exercise training may help to attenuate or reverse some of these health complications I also investigate the effects of exercise on health, function and quality of life after spinal cord injury.

I am also the director of POWER CORD - wheelchair accessible exercise. This facility serves as both a research centre and a community-based exercise centre for individuals in Niagara. POWER CORD currently has exercise programs for spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and amputees.


Keith Hayes

Keith Hayes

Dr. Hayes is a Professor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the University of Western Ontario. His postgraduate training in neurophysiology and biomechanics provided the grounding for his interest in processes of motor control. This interest was reflected in his research into various aspects of human reflex physiology and balance. More recently his research activities have turned to clinical applications of electrophysiology particularly with regard to spasticity and spinal cord injuries.


Audrey Hicks

Audrey Hicks

Dr. Hicks is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University, and she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Neuromuscular Function, Biology of Aging and Exercise, and Exercise Rehabilitation. For the past 8 years, her research has been primarily focused on exercise rehabilitation after spinal cord injury. Dr. Hicks is the Director of the MacWheelers exercise program, which provides individualized exercise prescriptions for people with spinal cord injury living in the Hamilton community.


Amy Latimer

Amy Latimer

Dr. Latimer is an Assistant Professor in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen's University and the Executive Director of Kingston Revved Up Assisted Exercise Program. Her research aims to understand and promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in the general population and among people with chronic disease and disability. Her research focuses specifically on a) identifying the factors that motivate people to adopt healthy behaviors, and (b) testing motivational interventions to encourage people to make healthy lifestyle choices. Currently, she is conducting research examining the best approach for communicating health information.


Brett Smith

Brett Smith

Dr. Brett Smith is a senior lecturer at Loughborough University, UK. His theoretical and empirical research interests concern disability, the body, health, and well-being; the development of qualitative research; and narrative inquiry. Brett is working on research that examines the effective ways of communicating health information. He is also examining the psycho-social well-being of spinal cord injured patients who are isolated as a result of pressure sores. Brett is the Editor of the journal Qualitative Research in Sport & Exercise.


Dalton Wolfe

Dalton Wolfe

Dr. Wolfe is an Associate Scientist in the Program of Aging, Rehabilitation and Geriatric Care in the Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada. He is also an Assistant Professor in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Program and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Western Ontario. Dr. Wolfe's primary research interest is in the area of health promotion for people with SCI and other disabilities, especially in examining the role of physical activity in enhancing health. In addition, Dr. Wolfe has expertise in examining the impact on health of the various secondary health conditions commonly encountered by those with SCI.


Jennifer Tomasone

Jennifer Tomasone

Dr. Tomasone is an Assistant Professor in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen's University. Her research focuses on closing the gap between research evidence and "real-world" practice when promoting (1) physical activity participation to individuals with disabilities and cancer, and (2) physical activity prescription by health care professionals. Using a theory-based, integrated knowledge translation approach, her work aims to determine the relationship between program implementation and effectiveness, and to apply this information when developing, implementing and evaluating physical activity interventions for special populations. Along with Drs. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Latimer-Cheung, and Martin Ginis, Dr. Tomasone is involved with the ongoing refinement and evaluation of Get in Motion.